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authenticlime

Posted 01 January 2014 - 09:35 AM

View Postbensite5, on 09 August 2013 - 09:53 AM, said:

Would love some feedback, anything in particular that frustrates you? or that just seems overly confusing?

Thanks, Ben

I find it overly  confusing, as to why anyone would use any hosting other then Site5.......been there a couple years now....and well its a dream compared to any I used in the past

bensite5

Posted 26 August 2013 - 07:10 AM

View PostGeorge Z, on 24 August 2013 - 12:26 PM, said:

My pet peeve is that when you go to practically any hosting provider and they will have what I call "the grid", just a huge data dump of everything their servers are capable of. A good example of "the grid": http://www.hawkhost.com/reseller-hosting

(In fairness to Site5 their grid is pretty compact and it seems someone actually went through it and curated it, pulling the highlighs into the grid: http://www.site5.com/resellers/web/.  The "features" section below the small grid is also pretty helpful.)

A host that has a huge grid just makes it confusing / intimidating for customers - instead of trying to be all things to all people, why not have separate landing pages for various marketing segments: Magento users get one landing page, WordPress users get another ("these are the things on our server setup that make us a great WordPress host ...").
Awesome thanks! We have a new site coming out any day now and going to work on de-gridding it a bit more too.



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View Postbensite5, on 21 August 2013 - 07:03 AM, said:

We are working on a project to give some benchmarks on base WordPress installs in Resource Points, so that customers can see that a base install of WordPress with super cache uses x Resources Points for 2,000 page views, and y for 4,000 page views. Would that be helpful or not enough?

Yes it would. One problem w/ shared hosting I see, from the customer standpoint, is that your sharing resources w/ people using WordPress without caching. I'm working with a smaller shared host who keeps me in the loop on how much cpu time my sites use and it's eye opening: some of my sites with no content and a base WordPress install were each averaging around 3% cpu usage (all dropped to 0 after installing WP Super Cache). I'm happy to use them as a shared host b/c I know that they're actively policing everyone on the server.
Yep it helps tremendously too, I think its the #1 item we recommend if a site is getting near limits. I added it on my personal blog which is super low traffic and cpu time / resource point usage dropped 50%.

Thanks for the tips!
Thanks, Ben

George Z

Posted 24 August 2013 - 12:26 PM

My pet peeve is that when you go to practically any hosting provider and they will have what I call "the grid", just a huge data dump of everything their servers are capable of. A good example of "the grid": http://www.hawkhost.com/reseller-hosting

(In fairness to Site5 their grid is pretty compact and it seems someone actually went through it and curated it, pulling the highlighs into the grid: http://www.site5.com/resellers/web/.  The "features" section below the small grid is also pretty helpful.)

A host that has a huge grid just makes it confusing / intimidating for customers - instead of trying to be all things to all people, why not have separate landing pages for various marketing segments: Magento users get one landing page, WordPress users get another ("these are the things on our server setup that make us a great WordPress host ...").

View Postbensite5, on 21 August 2013 - 07:03 AM, said:

We are working on a project to give some benchmarks on base WordPress installs in Resource Points, so that customers can see that a base install of WordPress with super cache uses x Resources Points for 2,000 page views, and y for 4,000 page views. Would that be helpful or not enough?

Yes it would. One problem w/ shared hosting I see, from the customer standpoint, is that your sharing resources w/ people using WordPress without caching. I'm working with a smaller shared host who keeps me in the loop on how much cpu time my sites use and it's eye opening: some of my sites with no content and a base WordPress install were each averaging around 3% cpu usage (all dropped to 0 after installing WP Super Cache). I'm happy to use them as a shared host b/c I know that they're actively policing everyone on the server.

bensite5

Posted 22 August 2013 - 09:15 AM

View PostLaura Upcott, on 22 August 2013 - 09:12 AM, said:

Thanks Ben! That's a generous offer.The truth is that I have a lot of work to do to optimize my websites. I'm slowly updating my sites with responsive Builder themes. I'm going to try to optimize my images, use more sprites, a CDN and, of course, caching.
Np, just let me know!

I'd love to hear how that goes and the impact, helps to hear some live examples too of the impact a CDN makes too. Maybe you can post here to share too :)

Thanks, Ben

Laura Upcott

Posted 22 August 2013 - 09:12 AM

Thanks Ben! That's a generous offer.The truth is that I have a lot of work to do to optimize my websites. I'm slowly updating my sites with responsive Builder themes. I'm going to try to optimize my images, use more sprites, a CDN and, of course, caching.

bensite5

Posted 21 August 2013 - 03:05 PM

View PostLaura Upcott, on 21 August 2013 - 01:03 PM, said:

1. Yes, they told me the location. But a traceroute showed that my IP was being hosted by worldwidehosting.com at a different location.

2. I use GTmetrix.com. But now that I've checked out the page load speeds in Google Analytics, I see that I was wrong about this point. My site is actually loading faster now.

1. Gotcha, you should trust them :), the info you saw on the domain is the IP whois, that is just the address of the company that owns the IP address. For example our company owns a lot of IP addresses that are used at 19 locations around the world, but the company address is what you see on the IP whois. We work with a company who has servers in Brazil yet the IPs trace back to their corporate address in the USA for example.

2. Gotcha, the big variable would be where the test is run from, a single location or multiple. And a lot of those tests are very different in what they are measuring. Plus 80% of a site's load time is due to the design & platform, not the host. Rough guideline at least.

Does the site feel snappier from your location?

If you PM me your site URL I'd be happy to examine and see if I can recommend some speeds ups too,
Thanks, Ben

Laura Upcott

Posted 21 August 2013 - 01:03 PM

1. Yes, they told me the location. But a traceroute showed that my IP was being hosted by worldwidehosting.com at a different location.

2. I use GTmetrix.com. But now that I've checked out the page load speeds in Google Analytics, I see that I was wrong about this point. My site is actually loading faster now.

bensite5

Posted 21 August 2013 - 10:52 AM

View PostLaura Upcott, on 21 August 2013 - 09:37 AM, said:

Hi Ben,

I recently moved my site to a new host. These are definitely the most frustrating things I'm dealing with.
  • Not being able to verify the geographical location of the server where my website is being hosted.

  • Having my site load more slowly after moving to a new web host plan with better specs and a higher cost.

  • Switching from CPanel to and custom site manager, and not being able to easily switch back.
Thanks for asking!
Laura
Great stuff, few followups :)

1. Would the host not tell you the location?

2. What do you use to measure the site loading?

Thanks!
Ben

Laura Upcott

Posted 21 August 2013 - 09:37 AM

Hi Ben,

I recently moved my site to a new host. These are definitely the most frustrating things I'm dealing with.
  • Not being able to verify the geographical location of the server where my website is being hosted.
  • Having my site load more slowly after moving to a new web host plan with better specs and a higher cost.
  • Switching from CPanel to and custom site manager, and not being able to easily switch back.
Thanks for asking!
Laura

bensite5

Posted 21 August 2013 - 07:03 AM

Great points!

Part of the problem is a lot of those variables are highly dependent on what the customer builds inside the hosting workshop. So for one customer moving from a UVPS1 to a UVPS2 might help load time but only because their site has variables x, y and z and is going to get more benefit from slightly more memory. And it is really really hard to put that in non tech speak because these are really technical items and just don't translate. And it requires a really in depth analysis of the website and platform it is on.

For example, on shared hosting we limit each user to 3 concurrent mod_fcgid php processes, but translating that to real-english is near impossible. A lot of people ask us does that mean that only 3 people can view my site? Kinda, but it takes microseconds to deliver those pages in most cases so it only becomes a limitation once your site is past the Resource Point limit for the different shared hosting plans (well past).

We are working on a project to give some benchmarks on base WordPress installs in Resource Points, so that customers can see that a base install of WordPress with super cache uses x Resources Points for 2,000 page views, and y for 4,000 page views. Would that be helpful or not enough?

And we are extending Resource Points to VPS so that you can see in most cases you can get 20,000 Resource Points a day or so on out of a VPSx etc. That will help too I assume to try to give a common metric right?


Thanks for the feedback!

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