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Yes, WordPress Way More Than Just Simple Blogging Platform

Just found this neat article at PC World on how WordPress is gunning for the CMS market. It’s rich in some good quotes and some things I wanted to highlight and maybe clarify.

Overall … WordPress as a CMS is hot and only getting hotter. In January 2008, we launched iThemes with our first CMS theme, Essence, and have been focused on that niche intensely since then.

We the release of our iThemes Builder in Dec. 2009, I think that further solidifies this theme with our business.

That’s part of our story … before I started iThemes, I personally used WordPress to build my church’s website and many other client websites.

One recurring theme I sense in this story is how the big web firms like to take shots at WP. I think it’s because they are seeing the cash cow days of building $20,000-plus and ineffective websites come crashing down around them as more and more designers and developers rush to WordPress to build attractive and affordable websites with it. (Something we’re hoping to help further with our WebDesign.com Certification.)

Anyway … on to the quotes in the articles ….

“In the last six months or so, over half the sites being launched with WordPress are really not blogging sites per se, they are complete sites.”

I’ve heard Matt Mullenweg, founder of WP, say on multiple occasions that WordPress as a CMS is the fastest growing niche in WP.

A larger enterprise would almost never want [to] use one of those tools for a major web property. But they offer useful alternatives for [small and medium-size business] scenarios, as well as simpler projects

Strongly disagree … and so would FantasyFootball.com, a HUGE mega site with tons of traffic, running on one single install of WordPress.

Across the Web, about 21 million sites use WordPress in one form or another

Love seeing how prolific WordPress is being used … more and more … and I think about just our little tiny community in that. It’s amazing. As of this writing, WP 2.9 has been downloaded over 7 million times.

[The Real Story Group] found that if an organization had to maintain a relatively simple Web site, one with 50 pages or fewer, then WordPress could prove to be a low-cost, relatively easy-to-maintain option.

Exactly! WordPress Pages, plus a good theme with drop-down menu navigation and you’re set!

“It’s not a [full] development platform, but it can drive a simple Web site fairly capably.”

That’s a fairly ridiculous statement. All the theme and plugin developers I know would seriously disagree and have amazing stats to back it up. We’re using WP for ALL kinds of stuff and pushing it to the limit … and it’s only getting better and more efficient as time goes on.

“WordPress has an ease of use that is something other vendors could learn from.”

The simple Dashboard is a HUGE selling point. I tell customers, if you can use Microsoft Word, you can use WordPress.

Another shortcoming is the lack of advanced content modeling.

We would have to seriously disagree. And introduce them to the awesome PODS plugin, plus iThemes Builder.

… using WordPress cut the cost of setting up a television Web site, from an estimated average of US$25,000 to $40,000 down to $5,000 to $10,000

Love hearing stories like this. The days of the big and unnecessarily expensive websites are gone.

The approach that WordPress designers take, Bar-Cohen said, is to keep the core of the software as simple as possible, allowing users to add on additional features through plug-ins.

I hope this stays true with WordPress because it is a critical benefit of using it.

Extend the base WordPress with themes and plugins, but keep the core simple and lightweight.

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Check out the full article at PC World here.

Comments

  1. Cory,

    Nice find. And an even better rebuttal/response to the points made in the article.

    It still sounds like we have some “educating” to do. Your Boot Camps and WebDesign.com are perfectly positioned to fill this need.

    Keep up the good work!

    – Bruce

  2. Hi Corey,

    A larger enterprise would almost never want [to] use one of those tools for a major web property. But they offer useful alternatives for [small and medium-size business] scenarios, as well as simpler projects

    Strongly disagree … and so would FantasyFootball.com, a HUGE mega site with tons of traffic, running on one single install of WordPress.

    I’m with PC World on this one. A larger enterprise != a high traffic site. WordPress is fine with high traffic sites, but it can’t handle complex workflows. I’d love to use WordPress at work (government agency), but we have hundreds of distributed authors and different worfkflows depending on the area of content, any one of which may need up to 5 approvals.

    I won’t repeat all my views, but there’s been a good discussion about this over at WPTavern:
    http://www.wptavern.com/forum/general-wordpress/1453-wordpress-not-cms.html

    To sum up my views: WordPress is a CMS, but it’s not an enterprise level CMS. It does manage content and does it fantastically for most sites. It’s just there’s a small, somewhat backwards, relatively closed world where it’s not quite the right fit. But that’s okay – for the vast majority it’s perfect!

  3. Thanks for the article. Very good and very true. I kind of stumbled upon the notion of WordPress as a valid CMS. At first, I kind of laughed at the notion, but when I started exploring CMS solutions for my employer I was somewhat frustrated at their level of complexity for the people who would be managing them.

    However, when creating a site for a church I didn’t want to be stuck as webmaster for this particular group and found an absolutely perfect WP theme that got me hooked on the idea. So I’ve been experimenting with the notion whenever I can.

    Like someone mentioned, it isn’t quite able to handle my employers needs because of the complexity of workflow…but for MOST of the sites that I create otherwise, it’s ideal.

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